Broccoli

Promotes Skin Health

Broccoli contains a substance called glucoraphanin that gets converted into sulforaphane, aiding skin repair and resulting in healthy skin. Thus, eating broccoli renews your skin more quickly and gives your complexion a beautiful natural glow.

Studies show that extracts of broccoli sprouts protect against skin damage and cancer caused by UV radiation

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3280724/

Enhances Liver Health

Broccoli has been found to prevent liver cancer and even aid in its treatment.

Broccoli sprouts can raise the levels of detoxification enzymes and protect the liver from damage. The vegetable might also prevent liver failure. Eating 4 servings of broccoli a week can do wonders to your liver health.

Dietary broccoli has also been found to prevent fatty liver disease, as per another study.

https://news.aces.illinois.edu/news/study-shows-broccoli-may-offer-protection-against-liver-cancer
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4763488/

Diabetes and Autism

For obese individuals with type 2 diabetes, broccoli extract may be what the doctor ordered. Scientists reporting in the June 14, 2017 issue of the journal Science Translational Medicine, found that a compound called sulforaphane in broccoli (and other cruciferous veggies like cabbage and Brussel sprouts) could turn down the activity, or expression, of 50 genes associated with symptoms related to type 2 diabetes. The scientists gave the compound (in the form of a broccoli sprout extract) to 97 individuals with type 2 diabetes over the course of 12 weeks. Though non-obese participants didn’t see any effect, the obese individuals saw their fasting blood glucose levels go down a significant 10 percent compared with a control group. The dose, however, is 100 times what is found naturally in broccoli, the researchers reported.

The same compound was also found to improve symptoms related to autism; those who took the extract containing sulforaphane showed improvements in verbal communication and social interactions, researchers reported Oct. 13, 2014 in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.